David Chang Cooked Ramen on Jimmy Fallon

I don’t ever watch Jimmy Fallon’s show, although he is hilarious. Over the holidays, a relative asked if I had seen the ramen chef, David Chang, on his show, and I was surprised to hear that I missed it. Anyway, for anyone else who missed it, here it is.

Also, here’s a bit about David Chang from another bio article on him:

But to those who worship the steamed pork buns at his Momofuku Noodle Bar or the rotisserie duck at Momofuku Ssam Bar, or compete in the fiendish online lottery for one of 12 seats at the high-end Momofuku Ko, Chang’s a culinary deity: At 34, he has already won a slew of awards and two Michelin stars, been called a cultural demigod and been compared to the top chefs of the world.

Breakfast Ramen Scramble

This one sounds really good. I love the flavor of eggs and ramen and often make ramen egg drop soup. The format is different from normal, but well written so I didn’t want to mess with it.

Boil 2 packets of Ramen (your favorite flavor) in a larger amount of water than you;d use for soup, more like making pasta. Use the flavor packets in the water if you’d like, or save for a later step. If you save the packets, make sure you salt the water.

Have a nonstick skillet on hand large enough to hold both packets of cooked Ramen.

While the water is boiling, beat 2 eggs in a small bowl and take 3 or 4 teaspoons of the cooking water and slowly beat them into the eggs.

In another bowl or glass mix together some spices you like. I usually go Italian and use salt, pepper, parsely, basil, oregano, and garlic powder. If you like Indian feel free to use curry powder. Mediteranian use corriender, and turmeic. You could also use one or two of the flavor packets if you’d like.

Once the Ramen are cooked (usually about a 3 minute boil) drain well.

Coat the bottom of the skillet in a thin layer of olive oil and bring to a med/med high heat. Toss the cooked ramen in the oil to coat, and then stir in the spice mixture from the step above.

Once the spices are incorporated into the noodles slowly pour the egg mixture into the noodles mixing and tossing constantly. The eggs will coat the noodles and make a sort of thick sauce as they heat. The starchy water stirred into the eggs will keep them from cooking in too much of a scrambled egg mass.

Serve in a past a bowl and eat, or garnish with scallion, parmesian, baon, whatever you’d like.

Instant Ramen Burns Lead to ER Visits

NPR has a story about the dangers of instant ramen, which can cause serious burns and ER visits.

These soups are dangerous because of the way the cups are designed. The cups are tall, lightweight, and have an unstable base that makes them tip over easily. At Garner’s unit, the most common cases are small children, often toddlers, accidentally tipping the cup over on to themselves.

“It pulls down on top of them,” Garner says. “The hot liquid then burns their chest, arms, torso, sometimes their privates, occasionally their legs.” He says there’s no other injury that he sees as regularly that can be so directly attributed to a product’s design, and calls these soups “uniquely troublesome.”

Anytime you have a cup of boiling hot water it’s going to be dangerous, so I want to know what kind of moron gives this to a toddler. When I make noodles for my kid, I drain them first and I’d advise you all to do the same.

What else is interesting in this article that it links to a NIH study about this and about how manufacturers can reduce the risk of the cup tipping over by making the base of the container wider. There’s also an interesting chart of what angles different cups tip over, so if you are going to give these to your kid, you may want to look there.